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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 7043767, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7043767
Review Article

Paired Stimulation to Promote Lasting Augmentation of Corticospinal Circuits

1James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA
2Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA
3Burke Medical Research Institute, White Plains, NY, USA
4Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA

Received 13 June 2016; Accepted 11 August 2016

Academic Editor: Prithvi Shah

Copyright © 2016 Noam Y. Harel and Jason B. Carmel. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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