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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7167358, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7167358
Research Article

Gender-Specific Hippocampal Dysrhythmia and Aberrant Hippocampal and Cortical Excitability in the APPswePS1dE9 Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

1Department of Neuropsychopharmacology, Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (Bundesinstitut für Arzneimittel und Medizinprodukte (BfArM)), Bonn, Germany
2German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (Deutsches Zentrum für Neurodegenerative Erkrankungen (DZNE)), Bonn, Germany
3Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany

Received 21 July 2016; Revised 7 September 2016; Accepted 19 September 2016

Academic Editor: Christian Wozny

Copyright © 2016 Anna Papazoglou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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