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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7217630, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7217630
Research Article

The Right Hemisphere Planum Temporale Supports Enhanced Visual Motion Detection Ability in Deaf People: Evidence from Cortical Thickness

1Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B4
2International Laboratory for Brain, Music, and Sound Research (BRAMS), Montreal, QC, Canada H2V 4P3
3Centre for Research on Brain, Language, and Music (CRBLM), Montreal, QC, Canada H3G 2A8
4École d’Orthophonie et d’Audiologie, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3N 1X7
5Centre de Recherche Interdisciplinaire en Réadaptation du Montréal Métropolitain, Institut Raymond-Dewar, Montreal, QC, Canada H2L 4G9

Received 19 August 2015; Revised 16 November 2015; Accepted 18 November 2015

Academic Editor: Jyoti Mishra

Copyright © 2016 Martha M. Shiell et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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