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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7931693, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7931693
Review Article

Otx2-PNN Interaction to Regulate Cortical Plasticity

Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Biology, CNRS UMR 7241/INSERM U1050, Labex Memolife, Collège de France, 11 Place Marcelin Berthelot, 75005 Paris, France

Received 5 June 2015; Accepted 13 July 2015

Academic Editor: Tommaso Pizzorusso

Copyright © 2016 Clémence Bernard and Alain Prochiantz. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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