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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 8176217, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8176217
Review Article

Upper Limb Immobilisation: A Neural Plasticity Model with Relevance to Poststroke Motor Rehabilitation

1School of Psychology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK
2Neurology Clinical Division, Clinics Hospital, São Paulo University, Avenida Dr. Enéas C. Aguiar 255/5084, 05403-010 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
3Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Avenida Albert Einstein 627/701, 05601-901 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
4Human Cortical Physiology and Stroke Rehabilitation Section, National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 7D54, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA

Received 7 August 2015; Revised 13 October 2015; Accepted 19 October 2015

Academic Editor: Lin Xu

Copyright © 2016 Leonardo Furlan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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