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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 8524560, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8524560
Research Article

Repeated Isoflurane Exposures Impair Long-Term Potentiation and Increase Basal GABAergic Activity in the Basolateral Amygdala

1Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Genetics, F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA
2Program in Neuroscience, F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA
3Department of Psychiatry, F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA

Received 14 December 2015; Revised 15 April 2016; Accepted 24 April 2016

Academic Editor: Alexandre H. Kihara

Copyright © 2016 Robert P. Long II et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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