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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 8723623, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8723623
Review Article

The Current Status of Somatostatin-Interneurons in Inhibitory Control of Brain Function and Plasticity

Laboratory of Neuroplasticity and Neuroproteomics, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium

Received 4 March 2016; Accepted 12 May 2016

Academic Editor: Bruno Poucet

Copyright © 2016 Isabelle Scheyltjens and Lutgarde Arckens. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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