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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 9837321, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9837321
Research Article

Senior Dance Experience, Cognitive Performance, and Brain Volume in Older Women

1Jacobs Center on Lifelong Learning and Institutional Development, Jacobs University, 28759 Bremen, Germany
2Institute of Human Movement Science and Health, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09126 Chemnitz, Germany
3Department of Psychology & Methods, Jacobs University, 28759 Bremen, Germany
4Center for Cognitive Science, Bremen University, 28359 Bremen, Germany

Received 29 January 2016; Accepted 20 July 2016

Academic Editor: Stuart C. Mangel

Copyright © 2016 Claudia Niemann et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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