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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 9849087, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9849087
Research Article

Functional Reorganizations of Brain Network in Prelingually Deaf Adolescents

1College of Electronic Information and Control Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124, China
2State Key Laboratory of Management and Control for Complex Systems, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
3Beijing Key Laboratory of Computational Intelligence and Intelligent System, Beijing 100124, China
4Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100730, China
5Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100050, China

Received 5 June 2015; Accepted 22 July 2015

Academic Editor: Feng Shi

Copyright © 2016 Wenjing Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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