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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 9857201, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9857201
Review Article

Spinal Plasticity and Behavior: BDNF-Induced Neuromodulation in Uninjured and Injured Spinal Cord

1Department of Physiology, Emory University School of Medicine, 615 Michael Street, Atlanta, GA 30307, USA
2Brain and Spinal Injury Center, University of California, San Francisco, 1001 Potrero Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94110, USA

Received 27 April 2016; Revised 27 July 2016; Accepted 10 August 2016

Academic Editor: Michele Fornaro

Copyright © 2016 Sandra M. Garraway and J. Russell Huie. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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