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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 1892612, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1892612
Research Article

Sortilin-Related Receptor Expression in Human Neural Stem Cells Derived from Alzheimer’s Disease Patients Carrying the APOE Epsilon 4 Allele

1Department of Biomedicine, University of Aarhus, 6 Bartholins Allé, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark
2Department of Science and Technology, University of Sannio, 82100 Benevento, Italy
3Axol Bioscience, Chesterford Research Park, Little Chesterford Cambridgeshire, Cambridge CB10 1XL, UK
4Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care Medicine and Pain Therapy, Goethe University, Theodor Stern Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Carmela Matrone

Received 2 November 2016; Revised 31 January 2017; Accepted 22 March 2017; Published 28 May 2017

Academic Editor: Bruno Poucet

Copyright © 2017 Alen Zollo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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