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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 2652560, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2652560
Research Article

Pilocarpine-Induced Status Epilepticus Is Associated with Changes in the Actin-Modulating Protein Synaptopodin and Alterations in Long-Term Potentiation in the Mouse Hippocampus

1Department of Neurology, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel HaShomer, Israel
2Institute of Anatomy II, Faculty of Medicine, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany
3Institute of Clinical Neuroanatomy, Neuroscience Center Frankfurt, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany
4Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
5Talpiot Medical Leadership Program, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel HaShomer, Israel
6Department of Neurology, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
7Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel

Correspondence should be addressed to Andreas Vlachos; ed.frodlesseud-inu.dem@sohcalv.saerdna and Nicola Maggio; li.vog.htlaeh.abehs@oiggam.alocin

Received 1 August 2016; Revised 12 October 2016; Accepted 13 October 2016; Published 5 January 2017

Academic Editor: Alvaro O. Ardiles

Copyright © 2017 Maximilian Lenz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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