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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 3480413, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3480413
Research Article

Exercise Modality Is Differentially Associated with Neurocognition in Older Adults

1Graduate Institute of Athletics and Coaching Science, National Taiwan Sport University, Taoyuan County, Taiwan
2Department of Sports Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
3College of Physical Education, Yangzhou University, Jiangsu, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Ai-Guo Chen; nc.ude.uzy@nehcga

Received 6 February 2017; Accepted 15 March 2017; Published 19 April 2017

Academic Editor: Pablo Galeano

Copyright © 2017 Yu-Kai Chang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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