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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 3829472, 19 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3829472
Research Article

Biphalin, a Dimeric Enkephalin, Alleviates LPS-Induced Activation in Rat Primary Microglial Cultures in Opioid Receptor-Dependent and Receptor-Independent Manners

Department of Pain Pharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Joanna Mika; ue.teno@272aisaoj

Received 24 November 2016; Revised 12 March 2017; Accepted 3 April 2017; Published 10 May 2017

Academic Editor: Long-Jun Wu

Copyright © 2017 Katarzyna Popiolek-Barczyk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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