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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 4281532, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4281532
Research Article

Interhemispheric Pathways Are Important for Motor Outcome in Individuals with Chronic and Severe Upper Limb Impairment Post Stroke

1Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3
2Stroke Division, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3084, Australia
3NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Stroke Rehabilitation and Brain Recovery, Melbourne, VIC 3084, Australia
4Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3
5Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3

Correspondence should be addressed to Lara A. Boyd; ac.cbu@dyob.aral

Received 23 March 2017; Revised 27 June 2017; Accepted 8 August 2017; Published 16 November 2017

Academic Editor: Annalena Venneri

Copyright © 2017 Kathryn S. Hayward et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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