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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 5870735, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5870735
Review Article

Neural Plasticity Is Involved in Physiological Sleep, Depressive Sleep Disturbances, and Antidepressant Treatments

Department of Pharmacology and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Bioactive Small Molecules, School of Basic Medical Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology, Institutes of Brain Science and Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yi-Qun Wang; nc.ude.naduf@gnawnuqiy and Zhi-Li Huang; nc.ude.naduf@lzgnauh

Received 6 April 2017; Revised 27 June 2017; Accepted 13 July 2017; Published 18 October 2017

Academic Editor: Bingjin Li

Copyright © 2017 Meng-Qi Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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