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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 6160959, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6160959
Research Article

Developmental Changes in Sleep Oscillations during Early Childhood

1Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, Leipzig, Germany
2Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
3University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
4Sleep and Development Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA
5The KEY Institute for Brain-Mind Research, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, University Hospital of Psychiatry, Zurich, Switzerland
6Zurich Center for Interdisciplinary Sleep Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
7Neuroscience Center Zurich, University and ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

Correspondence should be addressed to Eckehard Olbrich; ed.gpm.sim@hcirblo

Received 31 January 2017; Accepted 14 June 2017; Published 16 July 2017

Academic Editor: Preston E. Garraghty

Copyright © 2017 Eckehard Olbrich et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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