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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 7125057, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7125057
Review Article

Understanding the Mechanisms of Recovery and/or Compensation following Injury

1Neurotrauma and Rehabilitation Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL, USA
2Department of Psychology, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, IL, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Michael J. Hylin; ude.uis@nilyhm

Received 19 December 2016; Revised 24 February 2017; Accepted 26 March 2017; Published 20 April 2017

Academic Editor: Andrea Turolla

Copyright © 2017 Michael J. Hylin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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