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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 8361290, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8361290
Research Article

Social Isolation Alters Social and Mating Behavior in the R451C Neuroligin Mouse Model of Autism

1Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne Brain Centre, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
2Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
3Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
4Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, 245 Burgundy St, Heidelberg, VIC 3084, Australia

Correspondence should be addressed to E. L. Burrows; ua.ude.yerolf@sworrub.amme

Received 16 May 2016; Revised 28 October 2016; Accepted 22 November 2016; Published 31 January 2017

Academic Editor: Wim E. Crusio

Copyright © 2017 E. L. Burrows et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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