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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8740353, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8740353
Research Article

Right Hemisphere Remapping of Naming Functions Depends on Lesion Size and Location in Poststroke Aphasia

1Department of Neurology, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA
2Research Division, MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital, Washington, DC, USA
3Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Peter E. Turkeltaub; ude.nwotegroeg@ptlekrut

Received 8 July 2016; Accepted 24 November 2016; Published 12 January 2017

Academic Editor: Cynthia K. Thompson

Copyright © 2017 Laura M. Skipper-Kallal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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