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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8796239, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8796239
Research Article

Sensorimotor Cortical Neuroplasticity in the Early Stage of Bell’s Palsy

1The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, China
2Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Maosheng Xu; nc.ude.umcz@661smux and Jian Kong; ude.dravrah.hgm@2gnokj

Received 16 August 2016; Revised 22 December 2016; Accepted 5 January 2017; Published 19 February 2017

Academic Editor: Lin Xu

Copyright © 2017 Wenwen Song et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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