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Volume 2017, Article ID 9297621, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9297621
Research Article

Correlation between Traits of Emotion-Based Impulsivity and Intrinsic Default-Mode Network Activity

1College of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Agriculture & Forestry University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, China
2Laboratory of Neuroimaging, National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
3Center for Brain Imaging, School of Life Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710071, China
4National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Gene-Jack Wang; vog.hin@gnaw.kcaj-eneg

Received 9 June 2017; Revised 24 September 2017; Accepted 15 October 2017; Published 31 October 2017

Academic Editor: Stuart C. Mangel

Copyright © 2017 Jizheng Zhao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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