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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 9382797, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9382797
Research Article

Neuroplastic Correlates in the mPFC Underlying the Impairment of Stress-Coping Ability and Cognitive Flexibility in Adult Rats Exposed to Chronic Mild Stress during Adolescence

1CAS Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Beijing, China
2The University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
3School of Nursing, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai, China
4School of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory of Behavior and Mental Health, Peking University, Beijing, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Weiwen Wang; nc.ca.hcysp@wwgnaw

Received 17 October 2016; Accepted 18 December 2016; Published 15 January 2017

Academic Editor: Fushun Wang

Copyright © 2017 Yu Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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