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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 5651391, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5651391
Research Article

Motor Imagery during Action Observation of Locomotor Tasks Improves Rehabilitation Outcome in Older Adults after Total Hip Arthroplasty

1Institute for Kinesiology Research, Science and Research Centre Koper, Koper, Slovenia
2Department of Health Sciences, Alma Mater Europaea-ECM, Maribor, Slovenia
3EA4660, C3S Culture Sport Health Society, Université de Franche-Comté, Besançon, France
4Valdoltra Orthopaedic Hospital, Ankaran, Slovenia
5Department of Medicine, Movement and Sport Sciences, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland

Correspondence should be addressed to Uros Marusic; moc.kooltuo@cisuramu

Received 23 November 2017; Accepted 4 February 2018; Published 19 March 2018

Academic Editor: Michela Bassolino

Copyright © 2018 Uros Marusic et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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