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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2018, Article ID 5846096, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5846096
Review Article

Stimulating the Healthy Brain to Investigate Neural Correlates of Motor Preparation: A Systematic Review

1Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation and Social Integration, Québec, QC, Canada
2Department of Rehabilitation, Laval University, Québec, QC, Canada

Correspondence should be addressed to Catherine Mercier; ac.lavalu.aer@reicrem.enirehtac

Received 29 July 2017; Revised 8 November 2017; Accepted 22 November 2017; Published 4 February 2018

Academic Editor: Michele Fornaro

Copyright © 2018 Cécilia Neige et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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