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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2018, Article ID 6436453, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6436453
Review Article

Regulation of Central Nervous System Myelination in Higher Brain Functions

Department of Biological Chemistry and Pharmacology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Chen Gu; ude.uso@94.ug

Received 21 August 2017; Accepted 3 January 2018; Published 5 March 2018

Academic Editor: Long-Jun Wu

Copyright © 2018 Mara Nickel and Chen Gu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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