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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2018, Article ID 9235796, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/9235796
Research Article

Pharmacological Modulation of Three Modalities of CA1 Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation in the Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

1Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
2Postgraduate Program in Medicine, Cardiology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, 04024-002 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
3Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
4Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Alberto C. S. Costa; ude.esac@atsoc.otrebla

Received 13 January 2018; Accepted 15 March 2018; Published 10 April 2018

Academic Editor: Massimo Grilli

Copyright © 2018 Jonah J. Scott-McKean et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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