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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2019, Article ID 2687150, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/2687150
Research Article

Hyperexcitability of Cortical Oscillations in Patients with Somatoform Pain Disorder: A Resting-State EEG Study

1School of Psychology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China
2Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Affective and Social Cognitive Science, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China
3Department of Pain Medicine and Shenzhen Municipal Key Laboratory for Pain Medicine, Shenzhen Nanshan People’s Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Science Center, Shenzhen, China
4School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China
5Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Correspondence should be addressed to Wutao Lou; moc.liamg@oatuwuol and Weiwei Peng; moc.liamg@3290gnep.ww

Received 18 November 2018; Revised 16 April 2019; Accepted 15 May 2019; Published 9 July 2019

Guest Editor: Matteo Feurra

Copyright © 2019 Qian Ye et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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