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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2019, Article ID 3681430, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/3681430
Research Article

Altered Spontaneous Brain Activity of Children with Unilateral Amblyopia: A Resting State fMRI Study

1School of Computer Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083, China
2Hunan Engineering Research Center of Machine Vision and Intelligent Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China
3Department of Ophthalmology, Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083, China
4Hunan Clinical Research Center of Ophthalmic Disease, Changsha, Hunan 410083, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Manyi Xiao; moc.361@26891137931

Received 27 December 2018; Revised 1 May 2019; Accepted 27 June 2019; Published 25 July 2019

Guest Editor: Benjamin Thompson

Copyright © 2019 Peishan Dai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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