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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2019, Article ID 7647204, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/7647204
Research Article

Power Spectral Density and Functional Connectivity Changes due to a Sensorimotor Neurofeedback Training: A Preliminary Study

1Research Institute on Health Sciences (IUNICS), University of Balearic Islands, 07122 Palma, Spain
2Brain, Mind and Behavior Research Center, University of Granada (CIMCYC-UGR), 18011 Granada, Spain
3University Ramon Llull, Blanquerna, FPCEE, 08022 Barcelona, Spain
4Departamento de Ingeniería Gráfica, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 Valencia, Spain

Correspondence should be addressed to Miguel A. Muñoz; se.rgu@zoumam

Received 10 February 2019; Accepted 3 April 2019; Published 5 May 2019

Academic Editor: Takashi Hanakawa

Copyright © 2019 Juan L. Terrasa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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