Neural Plasticity

Molecular Mechanisms of Memory Consolidation, Reconsolidation, and Persistence


Status
Published

Lead Editor

1University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina

2Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, USA

3University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK


Molecular Mechanisms of Memory Consolidation, Reconsolidation, and Persistence

Description

The experience of a salient event can lead to the formation and storage of a long term memory that can sculpt and alter future behavior up to a lifetime. In the brain, specific signalling pathways and patterns of gene expression are required in neuronal and nonneuronal cells for the stabilization and long-term persistence of synaptic changes that underlie memory. Depending on the retrieval conditions, these fully consolidated memories can undergo reconsolidation or extinction that will maintain or inhibit the expression of the original memory, respectively. These opposing memory processes recruit distinctive subcellular events in order to restabilize the original memory or to form a new inhibitory memory trace.

The persistent nature of maladaptive memory components is a common characteristic in several psychiatric disorders including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), specific phobias, and drug addiction. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation, persistence, and maintenance of different forms of memories will prove to be invaluable at both the foundational and translational levels, helping the design and development of new therapeutical approaches.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Cellular components required for original and extinction memory formation and persistence
  • Subcellular pathways underlying the formation and persistence of aversive and appetitive memories
  • Role of neurochemical signalling in memory formation and persistence
  • Molecular mechanisms underlying the formation and persistence of instrumental memories
  • Effects of retrieval on memory persistence, at both the molecular and behavioral levels
  • Recent advances in molecular biological tools for the study of memory
  • Interactions between different brain structures that support memory formation and persistence

Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 687175
  • - Editorial

Molecular Mechanisms of Memory Consolidation, Reconsolidation, and Persistence

Emiliano Merlo | Pedro Bekinschtein | ... | Jorge H. Medina
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 414173
  • - Review Article

Retrosplenial Cortex and Long-Term Memory: Molecules to Behavior

Travis P. Todd | David J. Bucci
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 658918
  • - Research Article

Muscarinic ACh Receptors Contribute to Aversive Olfactory Learning in Drosophila

Bryon Silva | Claudia Molina-Fernández | ... | Jorge M. Campusano
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 759139
  • - Review Article

Autobiographical Memory Disturbances in Depression: A Novel Therapeutic Target?

Cristiano A. Köhler | André F. Carvalho | ... | Martín Cammarota
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 603672
  • - Research Article

Evidence of Maintenance Tagging in the Hippocampus for the Persistence of Long-Lasting Memory Storage

Micol Tomaiuolo | Cynthia Katche | ... | Jorge H. Medina
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 717958
  • - Review Article

Involvement of Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Learning and Forgetting

Suk-yu Yau | Ang Li | Kwok-Fai So
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 650780
  • - Review Article

Behavioral Tagging: A Translation of the Synaptic Tagging and Capture Hypothesis

Diego Moncada | Fabricio Ballarini | Haydée Viola
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 184083
  • - Review Article

New Insights on Retrieval-Induced and Ongoing Memory Consolidation: Lessons from Arc

Jean-Pascal Morin | Kioko Guzmán-Ramos | Federico Bermudez-Rattoni
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2015
  • - Article ID 847136
  • - Research Article

Hippocampal Infusion of Zeta Inhibitory Peptide Impairs Recent, but Not Remote, Recognition Memory in Rats

Jena B. Hales | Amber C. Ocampo | ... | Robert E. Clark
Neural Plasticity
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate53%
Submission to final decision58 days
Acceptance to publication37 days
CiteScore6.900
Impact Factor3.093
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