Neurology Research International
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate19%
Submission to final decision58 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore2.400
Journal Citation Indicator0.330
Impact Factor-

The Role of ACE2 Receptors of the Olfactory System in Anosmia in COVID-19: An Overview

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 Journal profile

Neurology Research International focuses on diseases of the nervous system, as well as normal neurological functioning. Research topics include basic, translational, and clinical research, including animal models and clinical trials.

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Neurology Research International maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Deficits in Working Memory and Theory of Mind May Underlie Difficulties in Social Perception of Children with ADHD

Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are prone to peer rejection and disliking due to difficulties in social perception and interaction. To address social perception impairments in ADHD, we examined children with ADHD in a noisy biological motion (BM) direction discrimination paradigm in association with sociocognitive factors including emotion regulation, theory of mind (TOM), and working memory compared to healthy controls. Our results showed that children with ADHD were poorer in discriminating BM direction in noisy environments (F (1, 36) = 4.655, ). Moreover, a significant correlation was found between working memory and TOM with BM discrimination in an ADHD group (r = 0.442, , and r = 0.403, , respectively). Our findings could suggest that social perception in noisy scenarios may be affected by memory and social cognitive abilities of children with ADHD.

Review Article

Factors Affecting Vagus Nerve Stimulation Outcomes in Epilepsy

Epilepsy as a common neurological disease is mostly managed effectively with antiepileptic medications. One-third of patients do not respond to medical treatments requiring alternative therapies. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been used in the last decades for the treatment of medically resistant epilepsy. Despite the extensive use of VNS in these patients, factors associated with clinical outcomes of VNS remain to be elucidated. In this study, we evaluated factors affecting VNS outcomes in epileptic patients to have a better understanding of patients who are better candidates for VNS therapy. Several databases including PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched through June 2020 for relevant articles. The following factors were assessed in this review: previous surgical history, age at implantation and gender, types of epilepsy, duration of epilepsy, age at epilepsy onset, frequency of attacks, antiepileptic drugs, VNS parameters, EEG findings, MRI findings, and biomarkers. Literature data show that nonresponder rates range between 25% and 65%. Given the complexity and diversity of factors associated with response to VNS, more clinical studies are needed to establish better paradigm for selection of patients for VNS therapy.

Research Article

Comparable Efficacy and Safety of Teriflunomide versus Dimethyl Fumarate for the Treatment of Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

Background. The aim of this observational study is to investigate the efficacy and safety of two approved oral disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) in patients with remitting-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RRMS): dimethyl fumarate (DMF) vs. teriflunomide (TRF). Methods. A total of 159 RRMS patients (82 on TRF and 77 on DMF) were included. The expanded disability status scale (EDSS), confirmed disability improvement (CDI), confirmed disability progression (CDP), and annualized relapse rate (ARR) were evaluated for the two-year period prior to enrollment in our study. The drug-associated adverse effects (AEs) were recorded. We conducted propensity matching score to compare the efficacy between TRF and DMF. Results. After matching for the confounders, TRF- and DMF-treated groups were not different in terms of EDSS ( value = 0.54), CDI ( value = 0.80), CDP ( value = 0.39), and ARR ( value >0.05). TRF discontinuation occurred in 2 patients (2.43%) due to mediastinitis and liver dysfunction, while a patient (1.29%) discontinued DMF due to depression. Incidence rate of AEs in the TRF-treated group was 81.4%: hair thinning (hair loss) (62.9%), nail loss (20.9%), and elevated aminotransferase (14.8%) were the most common AEs; in DMF-treated patients, AEs were 88.2% with predominance of flushing (73.2%), pruritus (16.9%), and abdominal pain (16.9%). Conclusion. Based on our findings, DMF is as efficacious and safe as TRF for the treatment of RRMS in our Iranian study population. Multicentric studies need to corroborate these findings in other populations.

Review Article

An Insight into the Current Understanding of Status Epilepticus: From Concept to Management

Status epilepticus (SE), a subset of epilepsy, represents a debilitating neurological disorder often associated with alarming mortality and morbidity numbers. Even though SE is one of the extensively researched topics with conspicuous data available in the literature, a scientific gap exists in understanding the heterogeneous facets of the disorder like occurrence, definition, classification, causes, molecular mechanisms, etc., thereby providing a defined management program. Cognizance of this heterogeneity and scientific limitation with its subsequent correlation to the recent advancements in medical and scientific domains would serve not only in bridging the gap but also in developing holistic and prompt management programs. Keeping this as an objective, an extensive literature survey was performed during this study, and key findings have been shared. The present study provides a semantic and perspective synopsis toward acknowledging the diversified nature of SE and its variants with respect to their definition, classification, etiology, diagnosis, and management.

Review Article

Focused Ultrasound (FUS) for Chronic Pain Management: Approved and Potential Applications

Chronic pain is one of the leading causes of disability and disease burden worldwide, accounting for a prevalence between 6.9% and 10% in the general population. Pharmacotherapy alone results ineffective in about 70-60% of patients in terms of a satisfactory degree of pain relief. Focused ultrasound is a promising tool for chronic pain management, being approved for thalamotomy in chronic neuropathic pain and for bone metastases-related pain treatment. FUS is a noninvasive technique for neuromodulation and for tissue ablation that can be applied to several tissues. Transcranial FUS (tFUS) can lead to opposite biological effects, depending on stimulation parameters: from reversible neural activity facilitation or suppression (low-intensity, low-frequency ultrasound, LILFUS) to irreversible tissue ablation (high-intensity focused ultrasounds, HIFU). HIFU is approved for thalamotomy in neuropathic pain at the central nervous system level and for the treatment of facet joint osteoarthritis at the peripheral level. Potential applications include HIFU at the spinal cord level for selected cases of refractory chronic neuropathic pain, knee osteoarthritis, sacroiliac joint disease, intervertebral disc nucleolysis, phantom limb, and ablation of peripheral nerves. FUS at nonablative dosage, LILFUS, has potential reversible and tissue-selective effects. FUS applications at nonablative doses currently are at a research stage. The main potential applications include targeted drug and gene delivery through the Blood-Brain Barrier, assessment of pain thresholds and study of pain, and reversible peripheral nerve conduction block. The aim of the present review is to describe the approved and potential applications of the focused ultrasound technology in the field of chronic pain management.

Research Article

Comparison of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke in the Medical Ward of Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia: A Retrospective Study

Background. Distinguishing the category of stroke plays a vital role in planning patient care. Simple clinical findings help distinguish the type of stroke. However, there is a need for diagnostic imaging. In Ethiopia, stroke is the most common neurological condition in patients admitted to hospitals. Yet, there are limited data on comparisons of stroke subtypes. Thus, this study was designed to determine the prevalence of stroke and to compare ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Methods. A retrospective cross-sectional study design was employed. Medical records containing complete information and confirmed diagnosis using imaging techniques were included. The data were entered into SPSS version 24.0 for analysis. Results with a P value of <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results. From a total of 312 stroke patients, 204 (65.4%) patients were admitted due to ischemic stroke. More females, 59 (18.9%), were admitted for hemorrhagic stroke than males. In both ischemic, 175 (56.1%) and hemorrhagic, 91 (29.2%) stroke cases, most of the patients were 45 years and above. Middle cerebral artery territory was the most common site of arterial territory infarctions in ischemic stroke, 158 (50.7%). Middle cerebral artery territory also was the most common site of hematoma in hemorrhagic stroke, 91 (29.2%). Infarctions in more than one lobe of the cerebrum (16.4%) and intracerebral hemorrhage in multiple areas of the cerebrum (7.4%) were observed in ischemic as well as hemorrhagic stroke cases. Most of the ischemic, 124 (39.8%), and hemorrhagic, 39 (12.5%), stroke patients presented loss of sensation and weakness of body parts. Hypertension was observed in 124 (39.8%) ischemic and 73 (23.4%) hemorrhagic stroke patients. The mortality rate of ischemic stroke, 47 (15.3%), was two times higher than hemorrhagic stroke, 20 (6.5%). Hypertension was the most common predictor of death in both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke cases. Conclusions. Ischemic stroke is a common type of stroke in the medical ward of the study hospital. More females were affected by hemorrhagic stroke than males. Middle cerebral artery territory was the most affected area of the brain in both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Most ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients were admitted due to loss of sensation and weakness of body parts. Hypertension was the most common risk factor of stroke as well as a predictor of stroke-related deaths. Identification of the stroke subtypes may be important in the management of stroke. Thus, health professionals, government officials, community leaders, and the population at large could be involved in creating awareness about antecedent risk factors and clinical presentations of stroke subtypes.

Neurology Research International
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate19%
Submission to final decision58 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore2.400
Journal Citation Indicator0.330
Impact Factor-
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.