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Neurology Research International
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 891605, 24 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/891605
Research Article

Subarachnoid Transplant of the Human Neuronal hNT2.19 Serotonergic Cell Line Attenuates Behavioral Hypersensitivity without Affecting Motor Dysfunction after Severe Contusive Spinal Cord Injury

1Miami VA Health System Center, D806C, 1201 NW 16th Street, Miami, FL 33125, USA
2The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, 1095 NW 14th Terrace, Miami, FL 33136, USA
3Department of Neurosurgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, 1 Jarrett White Road, Honolulu, HI 96859-5000, USA

Received 23 January 2011; Accepted 21 March 2011

Academic Editor: Dirk Deleu

Copyright © 2011 Mary J. Eaton et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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