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Neurology Research International
Volume 2011, Article ID 958439, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/958439
Research Article

Quality of Life in Prodromal HD: Qualitative Analyses of Discourse from Participants and Companions

1Department of Psychology, The University of Massachusetts, Tobin Hall, 135 Hicks Way, Amherst, MA 01003, USA
2Department of Psychiatry, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA

Received 20 September 2010; Accepted 23 May 2011

Academic Editor: B. R. Ott

Copyright © 2011 Rebecca E. Ready et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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