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Neurology Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 742059, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/742059
Research Article

Hypobaric Hypoxia Imbalances Mitochondrial Dynamics in Rat Brain Hippocampus

Neurobiology Lab, Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Defence Research and Development Organization, Ministry of Defence, Government of India, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi 110054, India

Received 21 February 2015; Revised 29 May 2015; Accepted 4 June 2015

Academic Editor: Herbert Brok

Copyright © 2015 Khushbu Jain et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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