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Neurology Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 794829, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/794829
Review Article

The Role of the Craniocervical Junction in Craniospinal Hydrodynamics and Neurodegenerative Conditions

1American Chiropractic Association, 1701 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 200, Arlington, VA 22209, USA
2American Chiropractic Neurology Board, 3710 Robinhood Drive, Temple, TX 76502, USA

Received 4 May 2015; Revised 7 September 2015; Accepted 17 September 2015

Academic Editor: Mamede de Carvalho

Copyright © 2015 Michael F. Flanagan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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