Nursing Research and Practice
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Acceptance rate6%
Submission to final decision163 days
Acceptance to publication14 days
CiteScore0.200
Journal Citation Indicator1.130
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Nursing Students’ Perception of Clinical Teaching and Learning in Ghana: A Descriptive Qualitative Study

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Nursing Research and Practice focuses on all areas of nursing and midwifery. The journal focuses on sharing data and information to support evidence-based practice.

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Research Article

Complementary Feeding Practices and Household Food Insecurity Status of Children Aged 6–23 Months in Shashemene City West Arsi Zone, Oromia, Ethiopia

Introduction. Appropriate infant feeding practices are critical to a child’s growth, health, and development during the first 1000 days of life. One in every six children worldwide receives a minimum acceptable diet. According to the EDHS 2016, the status of the minimum acceptable diet was 7 percent among children aged 6–23 months in Ethiopia. The study sought to ascertain the relationship between complementary feeding (CF) indicators and household food insecurity in children aged 6–23 months. Methods. A systematic sampling method was used to conduct a cross-sectional study of 536 mother-child pairs aged 6–23 months. The 24-hour dietary recall was used to collect data on CF practices using face-to-face interviews with socioeconomic and food security questionnaires. The relationship between complementary feeding indicators and household food insecurity was investigated using logistic regression analysis. The relationship between independent variables and complementary feeding indicators was determined using multivariate logistic regression. Results. Overall, a total of 67.9% of children received timely introduction of CF and Minimum Meal Frequency (MMF), Minimum Dietary Diversity (MDD), and Minimum Acceptable Diet were met by 61.7%, 42.5%, and 41.7%, respectively. Result of multivariate logistic regression showed there is significant association between household food security with MMF, MDD, and MAD [AOR: 2.02, 95% CI: (1.25–3.24); AOR: 1.55, 95% CI: (1.02–2.36); and AOR: 1.62, 9595% CI: (1.06–2.47)], respectively, while there was no association with introduction of CF [AOR = 0.87, 95% CI: (0.55–1.39)]. Conclusion. This study revealed that the rates of MMF, MDD, and MAD remained low in this study setting. Household socioeconomic status (wealth index, food security status, household income) and child age were found to be among the factors statistically significantly associated with complementary feeding practices indicators.

Research Article

The Reasons for Self-Medication from the Perspective of Iranian Nursing Students: A Qualitative Study

Background. The prevalence of self-medication has increased dramatically worldwide. This study was conducted to determine the reasons for self-medication from the perspective of Iranian nursing students. Methods. This qualitative study was conducted using the content analysis method. Fifteen nursing students were selected by the purposeful sampling method. Data were collected by in-depth semistructured interviews. Qualitative content analysis method was used for data analysis. The MAXQDA software was used for data management. Results. Data saturation was achieved with fifteen interviews with nine women and six men, with a mean age of 26.5 ± 4.8 years. The reasons for self-medication were explained in five categories and fifteen subcategories. Some of the reasons for self-medication were having medication information, having previous experience, easy access to medicine, lack of enough time, access to medical staff, cost of a doctor’s visit, inadequate respect for patient privacy, pharmaceutical advertising in the media, and information explosion. Discussion. Several factors are involved in self-medication. Given the dangers of self-medication, health policymakers must adopt strict policies for pharmacies that sell drugs without a prescription. Furthermore, it is helpful to run training courses on self-medication risks for students.

Research Article

Perceived Caregiver Strain, 3- and 18-Month Poststroke, in a Cohort of Caregivers from the Life after Stroke Trial (LAST)

Aim. To gain more knowledge of caregiver strain in the Life After Stroke Trial (LAST) population. Methods. This is a substudy of the LAST study, including all caregivers’ reports of perceived Caregiver Strain Index (CSI) at inclusion and 18-month follow-up irrespective of group allocation. The checklist “STROBE Statement—Checklist of items that should be included in reports of cohort studies” was used. Caregivers to adults (age ≥18 years), here defined as the person living with, a patient with a first-ever or recurrent stroke, community dwelling, with modified Rankin Scale (mRS) <5 and no serious comorbidities, was invited to fill out the Caregiver Strain Index at three months (10–16 weeks) poststroke. Domains indicating differences of change in perceived strain in the total sample were analyzed in a linear regression analysis. Results. Caregiver strain (n = 147) varying from 5% to 27% was reported by the caregivers at baseline and between 2% to18% at 18-month follow-up. The items indicating the highest level of strain at baseline and 18 months were as follows: “Care giving is confining,” “There have been changes in personal plans,” “There have been emotional adjustments,” and “I feel completely overwhelmed.” The samples were divided into age groups 0–79 years and 80–100 years, indicating a higher strain on the caregiver for persons 80–100 years at 18 months. Conclusion. Caregiver strain was relatively low both at baseline and at 18-month follow-up. Main caregiver strains were reported in terms of a sense of confinement, a tendency of emotional strain, and the altering of plans at both time points. Depression was one of the main explanatory factors for the perceived caregiver strain. The perception of caregiver strain was higher in age groups 80–100 years than age groups 0–79 years.

Research Article

Living with Atrial Fibrillation: A Family Perspective

Aim. The aim of this study was to obtain insights from patients and their family members on how families are living with atrial fibrillation. Background. Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and is often described as an emerging global epidemic affecting an estimated 33.5 million people worldwide. Living with atrial fibrillation not only affects the patient but also may negatively influence family members’ perceived health. The perspective of the family has previously been understudied, and more knowledge on how patients and their family members cope and adjust to life with atrial fibrillation may be helpful when developing future support for patients and their family members when coping with atrial fibrillation. Methods. A qualitative phenomenological study with an inductive, descriptive research approach based on Giorgi’s descriptive method was used. Data were gathered through 12 dyadic family interviews. The COnsolidated criteria for REporting Qualitative research checklist was followed while conducting the study. Results. Three major themes emerged: emotional differences, changes in family life, and uncertainty about the future. Atrial fibrillation had multiple effects on the family. Frequently, several adjustments and adaptations had to be made to accommodate life with atrial fibrillation. Conclusion. Patients with atrial fibrillation and their family members feel a need to talk about their emotions and worries. They required support and guidance to manage the challenges of living with atrial fibrillation. These results will be used in a family-focused intervention designed to support families in adjusting and managing their everyday lives with atrial fibrillation.

Research Article

Impacts of Nursing Work Environment on Turnover Intentions: The Mediating Role of Burnout in Ghana

Background. The nursing practice environment supports excellence and decent work and has the influence to entice and retain the quality nursing workforce. Appreciating the dynamics that affect the turnover intention of RNs offer reasonable solutions to the challenges of the nursing shortage, which directly influence the quality of nursing care. There is a paucity of information on the impacts of these concepts among RNs in Sub-Saharan African. The study therefore aimed at determining the impacts of work environment and burnout on turnover intentions among RNs in Ghana. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional design using a simple random and proportionate stratified sampling with a sample of 232 RNs from Municipal and Regional Hospitals, Sunyani, West-Central part of Ghana completed validated instruments measuring work environment, burnout, and turnover intentions. Descriptive analysis was done to find out RNs’ perceptions of their work environment and turnover intentions. Mediation analysis by Baron and Kenny’s approach was used to determine the mediating effect of burnout on the relationship between the domains of PPE and the turnover intention of RNs. STROBE checklist was used as the reporting tool. Results. While most RNs had a positive perception about their work environment, greater number of them had turnover intentions. There were significant associations between some nursing work environment facets and turnover intention. The results also showed a statistically significant relationship between nurse-physician relation (β = .353, t = 5.476,  ≤ .001), nurse manager leadership (β = −0.485, t = −8.192,  ≤ .001), nursing foundation for quality care (β = .400, t = 7.059,  ≤ .001), staffing and resource adequacy on (β = 0.485, t = 8.183,  ≤ .001), and turnover intention as mediated by burnout. Conclusion. Burnout resulting from an unsafe work environment impact RNs’ turnover intention. This phenomenon can potentially affect the human resource management and quality of nursing care. Policy strategies aimed at ensuring a professional practice environment and decreased burnout can therefore improve retention of RNs at their workplace.

Research Article

Use of Foundational Knowledge as a Basis to Facilitate Critical Thinking: Nurse Educators’ Perceptions

Nursing Research and Practice
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate6%
Submission to final decision163 days
Acceptance to publication14 days
CiteScore0.200
Journal Citation Indicator1.130
Impact Factor-
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