Nursing Research and Practice
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate7%
Submission to final decision80 days
Acceptance to publication34 days
CiteScore0.200
Journal Citation Indicator1.130
Impact Factor-

Knowledge on Newborn Life Support among the Healthcare Providers in a Tertiary Care Maternity Hospital in the Southern Province, Sri Lanka

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Nursing Research and Practice focuses on all areas of nursing and midwifery. The journal focuses on sharing data and information to support evidence-based practice.

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Research Article

Spatial Distribution and Determinants of Nonautonomy on Decision Regarding Contraceptive Utilization among Married Reproductive-Age Women in Ethiopia: Spatial and Bayesian Multilevel Analysis

Background. Studies conducted to date in Ethiopia did not explore the spatial distribution, individual-level, and community-level factors affecting women’s nonautonomy on decision to use contraceptives. Hence, this study aimed to assess the spatial distribution of women’s nonautonomy on decision regarding contraceptive utilization and its determinants in Ethiopia. Methods. Data were accessed from the Demographic Health Survey program official database website (https://dhsprogram.com). A weighted sample of 3,668 married reproductive-age women currently using contraceptives was included in this analysis. Bayesian multilevel logistic regression models were fitted to identify the determinants of women’s nonautonomy on contraceptive utilization. Adjusted odds ratio with 95% credible interval was used to select variables that have a significant effect on nonautonomy on contraceptive utilization. Results. A high proportion of women with nonautonomy on decision regarding contraceptive utilization was found in northern parts of Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region, Southern parts of Oromia, and Benishangul-Gumuz regions of the country. Overall, 2876 (78.40% (95% CI: 77.0%, 79.7%)) women were nonautonomous on decision regarding contraceptive utilization. In the final model, age from 35–49 (AOR (95% CI) = 0.63 (0.54, 0.72)), living in the richer households (AOR (95% CI) = 0.12 (0.03, 0.26)), being married at 18 years or above (AOR (95% CI) = 0.33 (0.19, 0.57)), and residing in an rural areas (AOR (95% CI) = 1.34 (1.01, 1.71)) and metropolitan regions (AOR (95% CI) = 0.71(0.54, 0.91)) were associated with women’s nonautonomy on decision regarding contraceptive utilization. Conclusions. In Ethiopia, the spatial distribution of women’s nonautonomy on decision about contraceptive utilization was nonrandom. More than three-fourths of married reproductive-age women in Ethiopia are nonautonomous on decision regarding contraceptive utilization. Region, residence, current age, age at marriage, and wealth index were statistically associated with women’s nonautonomy on decision regarding contraceptive utilization.

Research Article

Assessment of Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Skilled Assistance Seeking Maternal Healthcare Services and Associated Factors among Women in West Shoa Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia

Background. This study aimed to assess women’s knowledge, attitude, and practice towards skilled assistance seeking maternal healthcare services in West Shoa Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Methods. Cross-sectional survey design was conducted from 1 February to 23 March 2018 in West Shoa Zone, Oromia, Ethiopia. A simple random sampling technique was used to select the participants. The data were collected using a pretested and structured questionnaire. Data were entered using EpiData version 3.1, and descriptive analysis and bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out using SPSS version 20 statistical software package. Results. The study revealed that the knowledge, attitude, and practice towards skilled maternal health services were found such that 473.3 (72.4%) of the study participants had good knowledge, 180.7 (27.6%) had poor knowledge, and 400 (61.3%) had positive attitude, 254 (38.84%) had negative attitude, 460.3 (70.4%) had good practice, and 193.7 (29.6%) had poor practice towards skilled maternal health services. Factors that had a significant association with antenatal care utilization were planned pregnancy (AOR = 8.2, 95% CI = 3.39-19.78-0.87) and access to transport (AOR = 3.1, 95% CI = 1.46–6.61). Attending ANC at least once (AOR = 3.1, 95% CI = 1.13–8.41), women’s education (AOR = 3.0, 95% CI = 1.18–7.84), and unplanned pregnancy (AOR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.21–0.75) were factors associated with skilled delivery service utilization. Attending ANC at least once (AOR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.1–4.2), birth complications (AOR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.35–3.66), unplanned pregnancies (AOR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.22–0.68), and awareness about skilled obstetric care (AOR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.68–12.79) were factors associated with postnatal care utilization. Conclusions. This study found that the knowledge, attitude, and practice of skilled maternal health services among the study participants are low, showing less than three-quarters of the total sample size. Therefore, this study implied that interventions are required to improve women’s knowledge, attitude, and practice of skilled maternal health services in the study area. Furthermore, women’s education is significantly associated with skilled delivery service utilization. Accordingly, this study recommends that improving equity among the marginalized population is needed to increase maternal health service coverage.

Research Article

Nursing Students’ and Preceptors’ Experiences with Using an Assessment Tool for Feedback and Reflection in Supervision of Clinical Skills: A Qualitative Pilot Study

Background. There is a need to improve students’ learning in clinical practice. Undergraduate students need guidance when it comes to transferring knowledge from the classroom to clinical practice in community health services. Competence Development of Practical Procedures (COPPs), a simulation assessment tool, was used to explore students’ and preceptors’ experiences with feedback and reflection during the supervision of clinical skills in real practice. Method. This was a pilot study with a qualitative exploratory and descriptive research design. Four students in their first year of a bachelor’s programme in nursing and four preceptors participated. Data were collected from eight clinical skills performance assessments, audio recordings of supervision, and open-ended questionnaires. Data were systematized, categorized, and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Findings. Participants’ experiences were divided into five categories: “learning environment, an atmosphere of respect, acceptance, and encouragement,” “students’ reflections on their own personal learning,” “students’ reflections on various care situations,” and “students’ and preceptors’ assessment and feedback.” Participants found COPPs easy to use and providing structure for assessment, feedback, and reflection during supervision. Concepts related to learning clinical skills became visible for both students and preceptors and helped students assess their performance of clinical skills. Through verbalization and reflection in supervision, participants established a consensus around what students knew and what they needed to learn. Conclusions. The students and preceptors experienced the tool as a supportive structure to enhance feedback and reflection for the learning of clinical skills in municipal healthcare services. COPPs filled a gap in practice by providing a language for students and preceptors to articulate their knowledge and increasing students’ awareness of what constitutes a good performance. The tool supported the coherence of concepts, enhanced clinical reasoning, and promoted deeper thinking and reflection, and the students gained insight into their own needs related to learning clinical skills.

Research Article

Medication Administration Error Reporting and Associated Factors among Nurses Working in Public Hospitals, Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study

Background. Medication administration error is one of the most common errors that occur when a discrepancy occurs between the drugs received by the patient and the drug intended by the prescriber. A lot of studies were conducted on medication administration error. But there were a few studies on whether those medication administration errors are reported or not among nurses in Ethiopia. So this study is aimed at assessing the magnitude of medication administration error reporting and the associated factors among nurses. Objectives. To assess the magnitude of reported medication administration error and associated factors among nurses working in public hospitals, Ethiopia. Methods. An institutional-based cross-sectional study design was employed from March to April 2019. Simple random sampling technique was used. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. Data were entered using EpiData version 3.1 and descriptive analysis, bivariate, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out using SPSS version 21 software. Results. The magnitude of medication administration error reporting was found to be 37.9%. Being female [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.91; confidence interval (CI) (1.45–5.85)]; belief that errors should not be reported [AOR = .3; CI (.15–.61)]; having work experience of greater than 15 years [AOR = 3.4; CI (1.11–13.85)]; having bachelor science degree [AOR = 3.27; CI (1.61–6.66)]; and caring for greater than 10 patients [(AOR = .4; CI (.16–.96)] were factors associated with nurses medication administration error reporting. Conclusion. The magnitude of medication administration error reporting among nurses was found to be low. To increase medication administration error reporting, efforts should be made to change the attitude of nurses on the belief that errors should be reported, retaining staffs that have longer experience, upgrading staffs educational status, and limiting the number of patients cared by a single nurse.

Research Article

Nursing and Midwifery Students’ Satisfaction with Their Clinical Rotation Experience: The Role of the Clinical Learning Environment

Background. The clinical learning environment and clinical rotation experience of students are integral to nursing curriculum and are a crucial component of nursing education which helps transform theoretical knowledge to clinical practical skills. Objective. This study was aimed at assessing the role of the clinical learning environment on undergraduate nursing and midwifery students’ satisfaction with their clinical rotation experience. Method. The study employed a quantitative cross-sectional survey design. Data was collected from a sample of 240 undergraduate nursing and midwifery students of the University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana, using a structured questionnaire. Ethical approval was obtained from the University of Cape Coast Ethics Review Board. Descriptive analysis was displayed as frequencies and percentages. Inferentially, Fisher’s exact test, linear regression, and Spearman’s correlation tests were used to test for and quantify associations between independent and dependent variables at . Results. The level of students’ satisfaction with both clinical rotation experience and the clinical learning environment was high (65.6% and 63.5%, respectively). A statistically significant association of the students’ satisfaction with their clinical rotation experience was found. There was a statistically significant relationship between the clinical learning environment (χ2 (9, N = 224) = 80.665, ), pedagogical atmosphere in the clinical area (rs = 0.379, ), the leadership style of the ward manager (rs = 0.340, ), the premises of nursing in the ward environment (rs = 0.501, ), and the students’ satisfaction with their clinical rotation experience. Conclusion. These findings provide nurse educators and clinicians with meaningful understanding about areas to prioritise when planning clinical learning opportunities in such a way that skills learning and practice of nursing skills are successful and satisfactory for undergraduate student nurses and midwives.

Research Article

Students’ Perspectives on Learning Practical Nursing Skills: A Focus Group Study in Norway

Practical nursing skills are complex and involve technical, theoretical, and practical aspects, caring perspectives adjusted to both patient and circumstances, as well as ethical and moral considerations. Patients’ length of stay in hospitals is decreasing, and more advanced patient treatment is conducted in primary healthcare settings. Hence, education and nursing skills need adjustment in line with the rapidly evolving field of practice. Studies emphasize a need to uncover whether the technical aspect of nursing skills, in general, is challenging in students’ learning. The aim of this study was to explore students’ perspectives on practical nursing skills and how they can best learn these. Three focus group interviews were conducted with registered nurse students and intellectual disability nurse students in their last semester (n = 11). Conventional, inductive content analysis in line with recommendations from Hsieh and Shannon was used to analyze the data. Two main categories with subcategories were identified: (1) the content of practical skills, with subcategories (a) human-to-human relations, (b) organizational competence, and (c) technical mastering and (2) building competence, with subcategories (a) need for supervision, (b) planning the learning situations, and (c) relevance for practice. Students experienced that practical skills did not only include technical aspects but also the ability to establish a relationship to the patient and to organize their working day. Supervising was assumed as essential both when training in the simulation center and in clinical placement, as well as planning of the training, respectively. Students experienced that some skills learned in the university college were less relevant in clinical practice and that certain skills were difficult to perform in practice due to the type of clinical placement. Hence, there is a need to review the approach to and content of practical nursing skills’ learning in healthcare undergraduate programs, to prepare students for clinical practice, and to ensure that they build the competence needed in healthcare services.

Nursing Research and Practice
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate7%
Submission to final decision80 days
Acceptance to publication34 days
CiteScore0.200
Journal Citation Indicator1.130
Impact Factor-
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.