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Nursing Research and Practice
Volume 2013, Article ID 860396, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/860396
Research Article

Spinal Cord Injury and Pressure Ulcer Prevention: Using Functional Activity in Pressure Relief

1School of Health Sciences, Centre for Health and Rehabilitation Technologies, University of Ulster, Jordanstown BT37 0QB, Ireland
2Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Research Centre, University of Ulster, Jordanstown BT37 0QB, Ireland
3Belfast Health & Social Care Trust, Musgrave Park Hospital, Belfast BT9 7JB, Ireland
4Centre for Assistive Technology and Environmental Access, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA

Received 7 September 2012; Revised 6 March 2013; Accepted 6 March 2013

Academic Editor: Linda Moneyham

Copyright © 2013 May Stinson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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