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Nursing Research and Practice
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 985686, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/985686
Review Article

Flushing and Locking of Venous Catheters: Available Evidence and Evidence Deficit

1Nursing Centre of Excellence, University Hospitals Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
2Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium

Received 12 November 2014; Accepted 24 February 2015

Academic Editor: Lisa Dougherty

Copyright © 2015 Godelieve Alice Goossens. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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