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Nursing Research and Practice
Volume 2016, Article ID 9187536, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9187536
Research Article

Eliciting Challenges on Social Connectedness among Filipino Nurse Returnees: A Cross-Sectional Mixed-Method Research

1The Graduate School, University of Santo Tomas, 1015 Manila, Philippines
2Research Development and Innovation Center, Our Lady of Fatima University, 1440 Valenzuela, Philippines

Received 11 November 2015; Accepted 21 February 2016

Academic Editor: Kathleen Finlayson

Copyright © 2016 Mary Jane L. Cortez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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