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Nursing Research and Practice
Volume 2017, Article ID 1502854, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1502854
Research Article

Aggression from Patients or Next of Kin and Exposure to Bullying Behaviors: A Conglomerate Experience?

1Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
2Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway
3Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway
4Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway

Correspondence should be addressed to Iselin Reknes; on.biu@senker.nilesi

Received 21 June 2016; Accepted 10 January 2017; Published 8 February 2017

Academic Editor: Kathleen Finlayson

Copyright © 2017 Iselin Reknes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Although workplace violence and aggression have been identified as important stressors in the nursing profession, studies simultaneously comparing patient-initiated aggression and exposure to bullying behaviors at work are rather scarce. The aim of this study was to compare aggression from patients or next of kin and exposure to bullying behaviors in terms of prevalence, health-related quality of life outcomes, and potential overlap in those targeted. In the period of 2008-2009, data were collected among 2059 members of the Norwegian Nurses Organization. Latent class (LC) analysis and a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) were used to investigate the proposed relationships. The results showed that aggression from patients or next of kin and exposure to bullying behaviors were perceived as separate and independent stressors. Although aggression from patients or next of kin was more frequent than workplace bullying, the latter was the only significant stressor related to health-related quality of life in terms of reduced mental health functioning. Although being a rather infrequent experience, exposure to bullying behaviors seems to have more severe health-related outcomes for nurses than aggression from patients or next of kin. Hence, the results of the study strengthen previous findings and suggest that managers must aim to maintain a positive psychosocial work environment with zero-tolerance for bullying.