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Nursing Research and Practice
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8415083, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8415083
Research Article

Psychological Distress in Healthy Low-Risk First-Time Mothers during the Postpartum Period: An Exploratory Study

1School of Nursing, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA
2College of Education & Department of Mathematics, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, USA
3Maternal-Child Research Consultants, Austin, TX, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Christina Murphey; moc.loa@724yehprumc

Received 30 April 2016; Revised 2 October 2016; Accepted 8 November 2016; Published 16 January 2017

Academic Editor: Maria Horne

Copyright © 2017 Christina Murphey et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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