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Obstetrics and Gynecology International
Volume 2010, Article ID 580971, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/580971
Review Article

Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 as a Therapeutic Target in Endometrial Cancer Management

1Department of Gynaecological Oncology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands
2Department of Pathology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands

Received 31 October 2009; Accepted 22 December 2009

Academic Editor: Paul J. Hoskins

Copyright © 2010 Laura M. S. Seeber et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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