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Obstetrics and Gynecology International
Volume 2012, Article ID 392027, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/392027
Clinical Study

Ambulatory Pessary Trial Unmasks Occult Stress Urinary Incontinence

Continence Center, Urological Institute of Northeast New York and Division of Urology, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY 12208, USA

Received 26 April 2011; Revised 14 July 2011; Accepted 25 July 2011

Academic Editor: Lior Lowenstein

Copyright © 2012 Bilal Chughtai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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