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Obstetrics and Gynecology International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 612946, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/612946
Research Article

Pelvic Organ Distribution of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Injected Intravenously after Simulated Childbirth Injury in Female Rats

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Cleveland Clinic, Euclid Avenu ND20, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
2Department of Urology, The Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue Q100, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
3Department of Neuroscience, The Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue NC30, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
4Department of Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine, The Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue NE30, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
5Departments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, The Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue NE30, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
6Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Urology, and Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, The Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue ND20, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
7Advanced Platform Technology Center, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA

Received 8 April 2011; Accepted 26 June 2011

Academic Editor: Johannes Bitzer

Copyright © 2012 Michelle Cruz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The local route of stem cell administration utilized presently in clinical trials for stress incontinence may not take full advantage of the capabilities of these cells. The goal of this study was to evaluate if intravenously injected mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) home to pelvic organs after simulated childbirth injury in a rat model. Female rats underwent either vaginal distension (VD) or sham VD. All rats received 2 million GFP-labeled MSCs intravenously 1 hour after injury. Four or 10 days later pelvic organs and muscles were imaged for visualization of GFP-positive cells. Significantly more MSCs home to the urethra, vagina, rectum, and levator ani muscle 4 days after VD than after sham VD. MSCs were present 10 days after injection but GFP intensity had decreased. This study provides basic science evidence that intravenous administration of MSCs could provide an effective route for cell-based therapy to facilitate repair after injury and treat stress incontinence.