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Obstetrics and Gynecology International
Volume 2013, Article ID 324362, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/324362
Research Article

The Applicability of Behaviour Change in Intervention Programmes Targeted at Ending Female Genital Mutilation in the EU: Integrating Social Cognitive and Community Level Approaches

Faculty of Business, Environment and Society, Coventry University, Priory Street, Coventry CV1 5FB, UK

Received 29 March 2013; Accepted 15 June 2013

Academic Editor: Birgitta Essen

Copyright © 2013 Katherine Brown et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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