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Obstetrics and Gynecology International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 581783, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/581783
Review Article

Current Status of Comprehensive Chromosome Screening for Elective Single-Embryo Transfer

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, 7 Chung-Shan South Road, Taipei 10002, Taiwan

Received 10 January 2014; Accepted 12 May 2014; Published 1 June 2014

Academic Editor: Curt W. Burger

Copyright © 2014 Ming-Yih Wu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Most in vitro fertilization (IVF) experts and infertility patients agree that the most ideal assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcome is to have a healthy, full-term singleton born. To this end, the most reliable policy is the single-embryo transfer (SET). However, unsatisfactory results in IVF may result from plenty of factors, in which aneuploidy associated with advanced maternal age is a major hurdle. Throughout the past few years, we have got a big leap in advancement of the genetic screening of embryos on aneuploidy, translocation, or mutations. This facilitates a higher success rate in IVF accompanied by the policy of elective SET (eSET). As the cost is lowering while the scale of genome characterization continues to be up over the recent years, the contemporary technologies on trophectoderm biopsy and freezing-thaw, comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS) with eSET appear to be getting more and more popular for modern IVF centers. Furthermore, evidence has showen that, by these avant-garde techniques (trophectoderm biopsy, vitrification, and CCS), older infertile women with the help of eSET may have an opportunity to increase the success of their live birth rates approaching those reported in younger infertility patients.