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Obstetrics and Gynecology International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 276095, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/276095
Research Article

Placental Oxidative Status throughout Normal Gestation in Women with Uncomplicated Pregnancies

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center, 1650 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY 10457, USA

Received 19 October 2014; Accepted 8 January 2015

Academic Editor: Gian Carlo Di Renzo

Copyright © 2015 Jayasri Basu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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