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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 213686, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/213686
Research Article

4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal-Modified Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Is Degraded by Cathepsin G in Rat Neutrophils

1Department of Degenerative Neurological Diseases, National Institute of Neuroscience, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, 4-1-1 Ogawahigashi, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8502, Japan
2Department of Hygienic Chemistry, Showa Pharmaceutical University, 3-3165 Higashi-Tamagawagakuen, Machida, Tokyo 194-8543, Japan
3Department of Analytical Chemistry of Medicines, Showa Pharmaceutical University, 3-3165 Higashi-Tamagawagakuen, Machida, Tokyo 194-8543, Japan

Received 26 November 2010; Accepted 17 January 2011

Academic Editor: Kenneth Maiese

Copyright © 2011 Yukihiro Tsuchiya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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