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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 596240, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/596240
Research Article

Supplemental Cellular Protection by a Carotenoid Extends Lifespan via Ins/IGF-1 Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans

Department of Health Science, Daito Bunka University School of Sports and Health Science, Iwadono 560, Higashi-matsuyama, Saitama 355-8501, Japan

Received 1 June 2011; Revised 8 August 2011; Accepted 9 August 2011

Academic Editor: Consuelo Borras

Copyright © 2011 Koumei Yazaki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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